...Sanford Rose Associates® Owners including Karen Russo,...
Being a good mentor means you are dedicated to your mentees success, says Karen Russo, CEO and Chief Talent Officer of K. Russo Consulting, a boutique...
Karren Russo, IIPE, K. Russo Consulting
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Various Sanford Rose Associates® Owners including Karen Russo, Juli Smith and Mark Phillips, Featured in ZipRecruiter, How to Mentor your Team

Various Sanford Rose Associates® Owners including Karen Russo, Juli Smith and Mark Phillips, Featured in ZipRecruiter, How to Mentor your Team

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

Various Sanford Rose Associates® Owners including Karen Russo, Juli Smith and Mark Phillips, Featured in ZipRecruiter, How to Mentor your Team

Dallas, TX

11/30/2016

Being a good mentor means you are dedicated to your mentees success, says Karen Russo, CEO and Chief Talent Officer of K. Russo Consulting, a boutique executive search and human resources firm. Therefore when your organizations makes a commitment to mentor a team it must be all in.

“Plan the time, commit to it, and review together,” says Russo, who is also a member of Sanford Rose Associates, a Top 10 ranked network of independently-owned executive search firms assisting clients to fill mission-critical positions. “Don’t make excuses or let other things interrupt this.”

The best mentoring tip Juli Smith ever received from her own mentor on how to mentor a team was to ‘inspect what you expect.’

“When you give advice and mentorship, the key is to follow up and see if your mentee completed the tasks and assignments and to hold them accountable to the goals that they are setting to achieve their own growth,” says Smith, President of The Smith Consulting Group LLC.

Mark Phillips, CEO of HireEducation, a search firm focused on education and education technology, offers these four tips for mentoring a team:

  1. Get clear goals from team members and ask for permission to hold each individual accountable to their own goals.
  2. Make everything measurable. Be very disciplined about this.
  3. Develop meaningful personal relationships with them. “You don’t have to be best friends, but you should have deep insight into why they do what they do and into what’s going on in their lives,” says Phillips.
  4. Have regular one on one meetings. These need to be routine. If they are not, your team members will begin to identify one on one meeting requests with being in trouble.

Read more: https://www.ziprecruiter.com/blog/mentor/

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